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Aliko Dangote

Aliko Dangote, $14.4 billion

Nigerian, Sugar, Cement, Flour

Aliko Dangote of Nigeria is Africa’s richest man for the 8th year. He is the founder and chairman of Dangote Cement, the continent’s largest cement producer. Dangote Cement now owns plants in Cameroon, Ethiopia, Zambia and Tanzania and produces more than 30 million metric tons annually. His conglomerate, the Dangote Group, also has business interests in sugar, flour and salt production.

Mike Adenuga

Mike Adenuga, $9.9 billion

Nigerian, Oil, Telecoms

Mike Adenuga, Nigeria's second richest man, built his fortune in telecom and oil production. His mobile phone network, Globacom, is the second largest operator in Nigeria with 32 million subscribers; it also has operations in Ghana and the Republic of Benin. A higher estimate of Globacom's revenues led Forbes to increase the value we assign to it. His exploration outfit, Conoil Producing, operates 6 oil blocks in the Niger Delta. He also owns real estate firm Proline Investments, which has hundreds of properties throughout Nigeria. Adenuga studied in the United States, getting an MBA at Pace University in New York, where he worked as a taxi driver to support himself. He returned to Nigeria and made his first fortune trading lace and Coca-Cola. Along the way he made friends with Nigerian military bigwigs who awarded him lucrative state contracts; those formed the foundation of his fortune.

MohammedAl-Amoudi

Mohammed Al-Amoudi, $8.4 billion

Saudi Arabian, Oil

Mohammed Al Amoudi, son of a Saudi father and an Ethiopian mother, has accumulated a portfolio of construction, agriculture, and energy companies across Sweden, Saudi Arabia and Ethiopia. He made his initial fortune in construction in Saudi Arabia, and continues to build complexes from hospital centers to university buildings. One of his most valuable assets is oil refiner Preem, which bills itself as the largest fuel company in Sweden. In Ethiopia he has invested in agriculture, cement production and gold mining. His firm Saudi Star Agricultural Development has cultivated thousands of acres of land for fruits, vegetables, cereals, coffee, tea, flowers and rice fields for customers in Ethiopia and abroad. It exports coffee beans to Starbucks and tea leaves to Lipton.

Isabel DosSantos

Isabel Dos Santos, $3.1 billion

Angolan, Investments

Isabel dos Santos is the oldest daughter of Angola's longtime president and, by virtue of her investments in Portugal and Angola, is Africa's richest woman. Though her representatives deny that her holdings have any connection to her father, President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, Forbes research found that he transferred stakes in several Angolan companies to her. Her assets in Angola include 25% of Unitel, the country's largest mobile phone network, and a stake in a bank, Banco BIC. In Portugal she owns a nearly 7% chunk of oil and gas firm Galp Energia (alongside Portuguese billionaire Americo Amorim), and nearly 19% of Banco BPI, the country's fourth-largest bank. She is also a controlling shareholder of Portuguese cable TV and telecom firm Nos SGPS (formerly called Zon). In June 2015, media reported that she spent slightly more than $200 million to buy a stake in Portuguese electric power equipment firm Efacec Power Solutions. In October 2015, four members of the European Parliament publicly called for an investigation into her investments in Portugal, questioning their legality, saying that the method of payment --a transfer of funds by the Angolan government - "raises the possibility the Angolan State is indirectly and illegally financing private investments of his daughter Isabel dos Santos." A spokesperson for Dos Santos told Forbes that "Isabel dos Santos is an independent business woman and a private investor representing solely her own interests. Her investments in Angolan and/or in Portuguese companies are transparent and have been conducted through arms length's transactions involving external entities such as reputed banks and law firms."

Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Winfrey, $3.1 billion

American, Television

Oprah Winfrey's magic has rubbed off on Weight Watchers. Since the media mogul bought a 10% stake in the diet empire in October 2015, its stock is up some 90%. The long-reigning queen of daytime TV has also proven she can thrive without a talk show. Her cable network, OWN, delivered its most-watched year in 2015, following four years of double-digit viewership growth, according to Nielsen. Next up: miniseries Queen Sugar, coproduced with Selma collaborator Ava DuVernay, and TV drama Greenleaf, about a Tennessee megachurch.